The need to use PCs and Internet technology is more productive in African communities

Africa needs to open technology

Too many times I saw people in the 21st century African people who adhered to old ways in doing something – almost as if afraid of the new alternative way and sometimes very different now made possible by technological advancements.

The perfect example of this is easily seen in the attitude that applies to the use of PC / Internet technology. I have traveled to a number of African states and cities in my own country, Nigeria. The problem continues: People have the reluctance that appear to put this powerful and cost-effective tool for productive use.

Do not take it wrong. We use these tools. But that’s what we use most often, that I quarrel. Forget Yahoo 419 Mail Scam Artists. They are the fall of this. Information¬†notizie technology is for people’s use of thinking in creating and developing value-added resources that benefit others. What I see is that many of us just like to buy, have and show off our TI tools, instead of exploiting them to move to the next level.

The big majority of our people remain amazed by internet technology, rather than seeing it as the biggest leveler of all time, that today allows someone who is willing from any part of the world to mobilize the impact on people and places around the world, without Physical get there!

Why does our school not use PC / Internet technology well?

Why is it that we don’t have the proliferation of educational institutions using the internet to date knowledge to students in a way that will allow the last to pay less school money – if at all?

No, I do not accept that what schools and some universities currently done by having a computer center are the same as what I describe here. What I am looking for is the active use of PC and Internet technology as a more effective means of giving knowledge to students inside and outside the local environment.

That doesn’t happen at our current institution. Yes, they do computer and internet appreciation classes, but that’s where it ends. There are few or no efforts put into this tool to make and innovate. That’s why our educational institutions cannot boast have a website (if they have the website!) Visitors who come regularly to browse and download useful learning materials developed by teachers / pupils / their own students.

Often it is a member of our institution which is online to other institution websites in advanced communities to search and download information about our own society! Even if they are patriotic and try to find websites run by Africans living in Africa, their chances of finding the right (and up-to-date) information they want will be slim.